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-presidential running mate paul ryan. a legal challenge to the president's health-care law. >> thank you for being with us. >> good morning. >> let me show our viewers the headline. oklahoma challenges the health law in a new suit, the supreme court had ruled on president obama's health-care law. you have filed a new suit, what is it? >> we filed in january of 20 11 and within two weeks, we filed a separate action from the proceedings and florida. there was a total of 28 states. the focus of our original lawsuit was about the constitutionality of the law in its totality as a related to the commerce clause and the individual mandate. we began that litigation and motions were filed by the government and then the case was taken to the supreme court. after the decision, i filed a motion to lift the stay in oklahoma asking the judge to consider an amendment to our complaint. as you know, the original challenge about the constitutionality of the law, this is about implementation. this addresses the concerns about the irs ruled that was adopted on may 18 and the affordable care act's implementation of th
in 2005 and brings more than 20 years of leadership experience in the health-care industry. finally, that brings us to our keynote speaker tonight. most of us for member that moment sandra fluke entered the national spotlight. as a loss to net georgetown university, she testified before a house democratic committee on the importance of requiring insurance plans to cover contraception. her remarks drew the attention of radio talk-show host rush limbaugh, who called her names i will not dignify by repeating. but maybe what is not well known is that she had long ago devoted her career to public interest advocacy. before attending georgetown, she created and lead a new exit program that helped bring quality services to victims of domestic violence and even trafficking. she also co-founded a new york statewide coalition that successfully lobbied for legislation allowing gay teenagers and other victims of partner violence to civil orders of protection. she recently graduated from georgetown's school of law and now spencer time speaking out on issues concerning women and health-care access
provisions. host: is health-care availability widespread enough in this country, are we coming to a system where you have to go to a major metropolitan area to get cutting edge care or whatever? guest: it is not widely available in every way it should be. we have massive disparities in rural areas. doctors go to medical school in these funds cities -- fun cities. do they want to go work in a rural area where they have to deal with higher not practice premiums, bigger overhead costs, practicing out of their area and a broader range of services? there are increasing disincentives for good young doctors to go to rural areas and underserved populations. and now with the way reimbursement is going and with our health care system is, quite frankly, bankert, those disparities are getting worse. -- bankrupt, those disparities are getting worse. i have seen doctors go to a subscription service. people will pay me $1,000 or $2,000 a year and i will go to their house and they will have my number doctors are doing it and it is unfortunately creating a class segregation. host: nancy, your honor with dr
court had ruled on president obama's health-care law. you filed a new suit. what is it? guest: greta, without an action january of 2011, and a separate action with the proceedings of florida. virginia filed an action as well. 28 states. the focus of the original lawsuit was about the constitutionality of the law and the totality. at that related to the commerce clause, individual mandate. we began the litigation and motions were filed by the government. and in oklahoma, when the case was taken up by the supreme court. as of the decision in june, i filed a motion to lift the stay in oklahoma, the eastern district, asking judge white to consider an amendment. as you know, the original challenge was about constitutionality of the law. this is about implementation. this addresses the concerns about the irs a world that was adopted may 18 specifically, and the affordable care act's the implementation, if you will, of the employer mandate, the penalty under the law dealing with large employers. it is about that role an inconsistency with the language, the statute, and seeking to hold the p
? >> well, here is the thing. there are so many things wrong with this current health-care tax law. in addition to adding $1 trillion in spending, we are taking $700 million out of medicare. that is why seniors are so concerned that they will have access to doctors. there are some that said they will not take any more medicare patients. having these decisions made by medicare doctors and patients, not bureaucracies. i would make it a reversible tax credit, where people get coverage for major medical procedures, and by having its portable, it means that if somebody moves from job to job, they do not have to worry about a pre-existing condition that they or somebody in their family may have , so the me, that is a positive approach. it puts patients and hospitals and doctors in charge rather than washington. that would be a paradigm shift. the solution is not moving the $700 million from medicare, which is something we have to make solvent. it is in precarious shape. we will be right back, after this. we continue with our discussions. >> governor kaine, whether you think same-sex coup
] we're not going to kick the for an elderly and disabled out of healthcare to pay for a tax cut fed does not help us grow, and i will not turn -- that does not help us to grow, and i will not turn medicare into a voucher. after a lifetime of labor, no american should have their retirement years spent at the mercy of insurance companies. station retire with dignity and respect. -- they should retire with dignity and respect. they have earned it. we will reform and strengthen medicare by actually reducing costs, not by dumping those costs on to seniors. the same thing with social security. we will take steps to strengthen it, but we will not turn it over to wall street. we have been talking about what happens at home, but that is connected to what happens abroad. in 2008 i said i would end the war in iraq, and i did. i said we would wind down the war in afghanistan in a responsible way, and we are three good because of the incredible service and sacrifice of our troops, a new tower is rising above the skyline. osama bin laden is dead during good -- is dead, but we still face serious t
this term based on his vote in the health-care case? does that signal anything? is he now armor-plated? what does it mean? >> i don't think it means very much. i am one of those many folks who thinks that he wrote the opinion he wrote on health care because that is what he thought and it seemed to me the opinion -- and others will throw stuff at me -- was plausible enough on its own terms. there is speculation that, now he has shown that he is not a right-wing nut all the time, he can go back to being a right- wing nut most of the time. [laughter] >> any other questions about chief justice roberts? >> i agree. i don't think he will do much. >> we invite questions from those of you here. there is someone with the microphone who will make his way. >> josh bursting with politico. i wonder if convicted comment on whether any of the cases you discussed would be an opportunity for president obama were gov. mitt romney to score political points and what that argument might sound like on these issues? and is there any earthly chance that either of them would try to do something like that? >> the onl
been and are still being made in education, healthcare, modernization, social infrastructure, direct payments to the poorest households. and in our battle against hiv/aids, a new plan has been launched to consolidate agai -- gains that have been made in reducing the prevalence of the disease. our target is to achieve elimination and expand access to anti revival therapy -- anti- retroviral therapy for persons living with hiv/aids. the equivalent of about $80 million, the contribution to the financing of this strategic plan. but this is not enough. we are now finding ourselves in a rather ironic situation, one that is threatening the advances we've made thus far. ghana, like developing countries that have made remarkable headway in combating this disease, is becoming a victim of its own success. as the numbers of disease and rates of infection and mortality go down, so, too, to the figures in the global funding for hiv/aids programs. this leaves a considerable financing gap for many countries such as ghana that are not only trying to maintain progress but to move closer to complete er
problems, energy problems, environmental problems. our health-care system, our tax system. our regulatory policies. washington has taken another five-week vacation. it took a five-week vacation in august, worked two weeks, taking another five-week vacation. if these people did a better job, they would not have to take some much time off to campaign, raising money, because if they did a good job, people will reward you. when you do not do a good job, you have to spend a lot more time doing that. >> do you think we would be better off with a parliamentary system, where one party to control things for a time, and we did not have to deal with a republican house, a senate of democrats, so we are always at this gridlock? we kind of let the supreme court make the decision because the politicians cannot do it. >> we need to work at bath, but i have no idea how, because as you know, that is the way it is. it is human nature to maintain the status quo until the things get terrible. then people get flexible. that is the worst time to solve the problem. the best time to solve a problem is when your t
that same template to medicare, health care for those over 65, get the federal government out of the health-care business completely , give it up to the states, in this case, block grants that balance revenues and expenditures, and that is how we ever get out of this. giving it up to the states, 50 laboratories of innovation and best practices, that is exactly what we will have. we will have some fabulous success and some horrible failure. failure of lincoln avoided, success will be emulated. that is how we will find our way out of this. host: gary johnson is with us from new mexico. he will be with us for about 40 more minutes. we will put the phone numbers on the bottom of the screen as we take a look at the libertarian nominee and his race overall. there is a recent gallup poll that shows americans are split on the need for a third party. pretty much split. what is your argument for a third party? guest: in this case, i will argue that i am not the third choice but the only choice. in this case, i am on the ballot -- will be on the ballot in all 50 states. right now we're on the ballot in 47
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10